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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017

    bac ban2017July 1st 2017 Starting 11.30am Old Site

     Thanks to all those who attended, this years competition was a great success and one of the highest turns outs I have seen, so thanks to all those that came and supported the hard work of the HPAA commitee, in particular, Julia East and Margret Hastings, Julie Ruzbridge who put in so much hard work with the lovely food, Drew Price & Simon Read for their great efforts tidying up the sites and general helpfulness on the day, The Scouts and Guides for their help laying on Coffee and Teas and agaib for all those that supported the event particularly for Carlie Mayes for her Bees and Honey display and last but no means least Gerald Vale from the National Vegetable Society for his great job as judge and talk afterwards.  Thank you all

  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

    5 Year Crop Rotation Plan5 Year Crop Rotation Plan

    There are many plans for crop rotation, but the most reliable is the 5 year plan as ity seperates the main vegetable categories and gives a longer-term solution

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Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

Read more
  • HPAA Rules

    HPAA Rules

    Our rules are simple and easy to understand, please read them carefully and abide by them

     
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

     
  • HPAA Location

    Location of the HPAA

    Location of the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

Cooking Oca

How to Cook Oca

Oca can be treated much like potatoes regarding cooking but they need much less cooking time, simply boil, roast or mash!

To Roast
Just lightly toss them in olive oil or cold pressed rapeseed oil with a few twists of pepper and sea salt and put into a hot oven for around 20 minutes.

Try this maybe!

Stir-fried Chicken with Ham, Leeks and Oca over Steamed Mizuna

Ingredients

  • 1lb chicken breast, cubed
  • Rape seed oil for stir frying
  • ¼ pound ham, cubed
  • 1lb Mizuna (rocket if you have no mizuna)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 small leeks or 1 large one
  • 2 quarter slices of fresh ginger
  • ¼ lb Oca
  • Sake or water
  • 2tbsp dark soy sauce
  • Pepper jelly (depending how how you like your food)

How to cook:

  1. Cube the chicken breast into 2cm cubes
  2. Slice two small leeks or one large one, crosswise into pieces about 2 inches long, and slice the white part lengthwise.
  3. Cut about ¼ pound ham into ½-inch cubes
  4. Rinse about a pound of mizuna.
  5. Mince two cloves of garlic and two quarter-size slices of ginger.
  6. Cut ¼ pound oca into approximate ½-inch cubes. (Ocas don’t need peeling, but scrub them with a nail brush (I keep one for kitchen use only! to make sure no gritty soil is on them.)
  7. In a wok with a little rapeseed oil add stir fry the chicken till golden in colour and cooked through
  8. Add the leeks and stir-fry breifly.
  9. Add the garlic and ginger and toss, set aside.
  10. Add the Oca to the wok and stir-fry briefly.
  11. Add two tablespoon of water or Sake (Rice Wine) if you have it, reduce heat and cover wok.
  12. Cook Oca until they are just tender as you like and put them in the bowl with the leeks and chicken.
  13. Add more oil if needed and briefly stir-fry the ham.
  14. Add the pepper jelly to taste, and sake if using water if not to the wok to make a sauce, you need enough to make the final meal well coated but not completely imersed.
  15. Add the chicken and leeks mixture and coat in the sauce adding a little roasted sesame oil for flavour and toss a few times.
  16. Steam the Mizuna in the wok just until the greens have wilted.
  17. Spread the mizuna in a serving bowl or on a platter, and put the reserved chicken, ham, and vegetables on top.
  18. Serve the dish with steamed rice.

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

 

Aubergine and Tomato Bake

Aubergine and Tomato BakeAubergine and Tomato Bake

 Super easy and super tasty dish!

 

Oca or Potato Homity Pie Recipe

Homity PieHomity Pie

Homity pie is a traditional British open vegetable pie. The pastry case traditionally contains a filling of potatoes and an onion and leek mixture, which is then covered with cheese.  It has a history that dates back to the efforts of the Land girls of the Second World War and the restrictions imposed by wartime rationing.

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in July

Jobs to do in July

Harvest should be bountiful and the allotment is in full swing

Now is the height of summer, the days endlessly long, temperatures usually at their peek and you should be reaping the rewards of your hard work in the preceding months. Watering in this month is crucial to stem off premature bolting, tomato blossom end rot and splitting skins.

 

Jobs to do in August

Jobs to do in August

Harvest should be bountiful and the allotment is in full swing

August is the month of plenty, virtually everything you planted and sown will be giving you a crop, daily trips to the plot are recommended this month, harvesting, watering, and weeding all needing doing this month!

 

Jobs to do in February

Jobs to do in February

Time to do some groundwork

We get a glimpse of the early signs of the arrival of Spring this month. The soil begins to warm up around the middle of February and we can see for the first time this year the buds beginning to swell on fruit trees and bushes. Overwintering vegetables begin to look less sorry for themselves and they start to produce new growth.

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