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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017

    bac ban2017July 1st 2017 Starting 11.30am Old Site

     Thanks to all those who attended, this years competition was a great success and one of the highest turns outs I have seen, so thanks to all those that came and supported the hard work of the HPAA commitee, in particular, Julia East and Margret Hastings, Julie Ruzbridge who put in so much hard work with the lovely food, Drew Price & Simon Read for their great efforts tidying up the sites and general helpfulness on the day, The Scouts and Guides for their help laying on Coffee and Teas and agaib for all those that supported the event particularly for Carlie Mayes for her Bees and Honey display and last but no means least Gerald Vale from the National Vegetable Society for his great job as judge and talk afterwards.  Thank you all

  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

    5 Year Crop Rotation Plan5 Year Crop Rotation Plan

    There are many plans for crop rotation, but the most reliable is the 5 year plan as ity seperates the main vegetable categories and gives a longer-term solution

Welcome to HPAA

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  Featured Article
  Video
Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

Read more
  • HPAA Rules

    HPAA Rules

    Our rules are simple and easy to understand, please read them carefully and abide by them

     
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association: Privacy Policy

    Privacy Policy
    Here we set out our Privacy Policy on what information we collect and how we use this data
     
  • Important Information


    Please take some time in reading this section carefully as it will guide you through the protocols of what is expected of each persons holding an allotment and their visitors to the allotment sites.
     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

Recognising BlightRecognising Blight

Controlling Blight

Non-chemical control
  • Infected material should be deeply buried (more than 45cm deep), consigned to the green waste collection or, ideally, burned never composted composted.
  • Earthing up potatoes provides some protection to tubers.
  • Early-harvested potatoes are more likely to escape infection.
  • When infection levels reach about 25 percent of leaves affected or marks appear on stems cut off foliage (haulm) severing the stalks near soil level and raking up debris. When the skin on tubers has hardened, after about two weeks, the tubers are dug up and stored. To prevent slug damage avoid leaving tubers in soil after this time.
  • Operate a rotation to reduce the risk of infection, ideally of at least four years.
  • Destroy all potatoes left in the soil and waste from storage before the following spring.

The genetic population of the fungus is ever changing and new findings have shown that one dominant new strain seems to have overcome major gene resistance. In the past some potato varieties had shown some resistance, these included ‘Cara’, ‘Kondor’, ‘Orla’, ‘Markies’ and ‘Valor’, but this is not currently effective. The ‘Sarpo’ range exhibit more effective resistance than other cultivars and can be grown satisfactorily without fungicide protection.

Some old favourites are very susceptible, eg ‘Arran Pilot’, ‘King Edward’, ‘Majestic’, ‘Sharpe’s Express’. Varieties that were previously rated resistant have been retested against this new dominant strain and the results have been published.

Tomatoes are generally very susceptible, but the varieties ‘Ferline’, ‘Legend’ and ‘Fantasio’ are claimed to show some resistance, but will eventually succumb in wet, warm weather. It is probably best not to rely on host resistance for blight control in tomatoes.

Chemical control

Because infection is so dependent on certain combinations of temperature and rainfall that periods of high risk (blight infection periods or Smith Periods) can be predicted accurately. Advisory services issue warnings for commercial potato growers on which they can base their spray programmes.

Gardeners are able to access these warnings (visit the Fight Against Blight website), but must rely on a more restricted range of protectant fungicides containing copper (Bordeaux Mixture or Fruit and Vegetable Disease Control), since the more effective systemic products are not approved for home gardener use. A fine spray covering all the foliage will give the best protection.

When wet weather is forecast from June onwards, protectant sprays are advisable, especially for outdoor tomatoes. However, in wet periods the fungicides sold to gardeners will only slow the spread, and not prevent infection. In dry seasons good control can be achieved.

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Oca or Potato Homity Pie Recipe

Homity PieHomity Pie

Homity pie is a traditional British open vegetable pie. The pastry case traditionally contains a filling of potatoes and an onion and leek mixture, which is then covered with cheese.  It has a history that dates back to the efforts of the Land girls of the Second World War and the restrictions imposed by wartime rationing.

 

Baked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal's

Baked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal'sBaked Salmon & Asparagus with Jersey Royal's

Tasty and so easy to make, great dinner party dish or a cracking family treat, and a healthy dish too especially if like me you have an Asparagus Bed or two!.

 

Lamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash & Mint

Lamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash, Beans, and MintLamb Cutlets with Butternut Squash & Mint

Simply delicious one of my all time favourites

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in October

Jobs to do in October

October is the month when it feels like the season is about to turn, the days start to shorten and the sun appears lower in the sky, the leaves change colour and fall to the ground and temperatures drop.  The first frost are likely too, which will be the end of many of your crops out in the open so if you still haven’t harvested frost sensitive crops now is the time before Jack Frost gets them!

 

Jobs to do in June

Jobs to do in June

Summer should be here!

Usually the risk of frost has passed by now, and with longer days there comes more sunshine and time to be in your allotment. If the weather is dry, then water your seed drills well before sowing any seeds – this way the young plants will develop a good root system.

 

Jobs to do in September

Jobs to do in September
September marks a change in the seasons, you'll be harvesting the last of your summer crops if you haven't already done so, crops like tomatoes, beans, peppers, sweetcorn will be finishing, but on the other hand the first of the Autumn crops will be nearing ready or may be ready like Apples, Pears, Main Crop Potatoes, Winter Squashes to name but a few!

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