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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017
  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

Welcome to HPAA

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  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • HPAA Location

    Location of the HPAA

    Location of the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • Important Information


    Please take some time in reading this section carefully as it will guide you through the protocols of what is expected of each persons holding an allotment and their visitors to the allotment sites.
     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

Recognising BlightRecognising Blight

Controlling Blight

Non-chemical control
  • Infected material should be deeply buried (more than 45cm deep), consigned to the green waste collection or, ideally, burned never composted composted.
  • Earthing up potatoes provides some protection to tubers.
  • Early-harvested potatoes are more likely to escape infection.
  • When infection levels reach about 25 percent of leaves affected or marks appear on stems cut off foliage (haulm) severing the stalks near soil level and raking up debris. When the skin on tubers has hardened, after about two weeks, the tubers are dug up and stored. To prevent slug damage avoid leaving tubers in soil after this time.
  • Operate a rotation to reduce the risk of infection, ideally of at least four years.
  • Destroy all potatoes left in the soil and waste from storage before the following spring.

The genetic population of the fungus is ever changing and new findings have shown that one dominant new strain seems to have overcome major gene resistance. In the past some potato varieties had shown some resistance, these included ‘Cara’, ‘Kondor’, ‘Orla’, ‘Markies’ and ‘Valor’, but this is not currently effective. The ‘Sarpo’ range exhibit more effective resistance than other cultivars and can be grown satisfactorily without fungicide protection.

Some old favourites are very susceptible, eg ‘Arran Pilot’, ‘King Edward’, ‘Majestic’, ‘Sharpe’s Express’. Varieties that were previously rated resistant have been retested against this new dominant strain and the results have been published.

Tomatoes are generally very susceptible, but the varieties ‘Ferline’, ‘Legend’ and ‘Fantasio’ are claimed to show some resistance, but will eventually succumb in wet, warm weather. It is probably best not to rely on host resistance for blight control in tomatoes.

Chemical control

Because infection is so dependent on certain combinations of temperature and rainfall that periods of high risk (blight infection periods or Smith Periods) can be predicted accurately. Advisory services issue warnings for commercial potato growers on which they can base their spray programmes.

Gardeners are able to access these warnings (visit the Fight Against Blight website), but must rely on a more restricted range of protectant fungicides containing copper (Bordeaux Mixture or Fruit and Vegetable Disease Control), since the more effective systemic products are not approved for home gardener use. A fine spray covering all the foliage will give the best protection.

When wet weather is forecast from June onwards, protectant sprays are advisable, especially for outdoor tomatoes. However, in wet periods the fungicides sold to gardeners will only slow the spread, and not prevent infection. In dry seasons good control can be achieved.

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Fagiolini in Umido

Fagiolini in UmidoFagiolini in Umido

 This is a great dish to use some of the abundant Green Beans that should be available in the summer months Fagiolini in Umido is an Italian dside dish simply means Green Beans cooked in Tomato.

 

Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

 

Pasta with Asparagus and Courgette

Pasta with Asparagus and CourgettePasta with Asparagus and Courgette

 Asparagus and Courgette are made for each other in this dish!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in January

Jobs to do on the Allotment in January
January is generally a very cold month with hard frosts freezing the ground and when the ground isn't frozen it is generally too wet to do much although there are no guarantees with British weather. Looking through my diaries, snow isn't that likely for a prolonged period but you never know.

 

Jobs to do in May

Jobs to do in May

May is usually one of the busiest months

The soil is warm and the plants growing well. But watch out for a sneaky late frost.

 

Jobs to do in March

Jobs to do in March

Spring is starting and the new season is here

 Hopefully by now we are now standing on the threshold of Spring and the new gardening season. The days are beginning to lengthen and although it may not feel like it at times the temperatures are slowly increasing day by day. More importantly the longer days are the real trigger to new growth and you will find that with the help of a little protection you can really go for those early sowings

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