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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017

    bac ban2017July 1st 2017 Starting 11.30am Old Site

     Thanks to all those who attended, this years competition was a great success and one of the highest turns outs I have seen, so thanks to all those that came and supported the hard work of the HPAA commitee, in particular, Julia East and Margret Hastings, Julie Ruzbridge who put in so much hard work with the lovely food, Drew Price & Simon Read for their great efforts tidying up the sites and general helpfulness on the day, The Scouts and Guides for their help laying on Coffee and Teas and agaib for all those that supported the event particularly for Carlie Mayes for her Bees and Honey display and last but no means least Gerald Vale from the National Vegetable Society for his great job as judge and talk afterwards.  Thank you all

  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

    5 Year Crop Rotation Plan5 Year Crop Rotation Plan

    There are many plans for crop rotation, but the most reliable is the 5 year plan as ity seperates the main vegetable categories and gives a longer-term solution

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Rhubarb & Custard Cocktail

Rhubarb & custard cocktailRhubarb & custard cocktail
An elegant vodka-based drink that'll wow your guests - it's made with creamy advocaat iqueur and homemade fruit syrup

Read more
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

     
  • HPAA Location

    Location of the HPAA

    Location of the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

Growing Cauliflower from SeedGrowing Cauliflower from Seed

Sowing in Modular trays

Use a seed compost which has a finer texture and lower nutrients than your standard multipurpose compost. We use a seed module tray with each section being approx 2 inches deep.

Fill the seed tray with compost and brush off any excess. When filling the tray rub the compost through your hands to break up any lumps. Give the tray a sharp bang on your table to settle.

With your fingers make small depressions in each cell about a fingernail or 1.5cm deep. Sow 1 or 2 seeds per module. If 2 seeds germinate you will have to remove the weaker seedling.

Cover the seeds with another layer of compost then scrape across the top of the tray with a stick to remove excess. Gently water your seeds. A good tip is to use a plastic bottle with small holes punched in the cap. This is less likely to wash the seed around than the heavy spray from a watering can. Place your trays in your greenhouse, poly tunnel, cold frame or windowsill to germinate. They should be ready to plant out in about 4 weeks.

If you're sowing in March the seeds will need some warmth. Use a propagator, heat mat or a warm south facing windowsill.

Watering

It's important to keep you seedlings properly watered before you plant them out in the garden. You are actually far better to under rather than over water your plants. This may sound odd but making the roots search for water helps to develop a better root system. It's a bit like keeping fit.

You do need to be careful, however, not to let the compost plug completely dry out or it will form a crust on top and won't absorb the moisture the next time you water. It will all depend on the weather of course but on a hot day you will need to water twice a day, if it's it's dull every 2 days will be fine.

Hardening Off

Plants that have been raised indoors will need to get used to the outdoor temperature and conditions before they can be planted outside, this will take about a week to 10 days depending on the weather.

The best way is to use a cloche or mini greenhouse. You can leave the cloche off the plants on dry frost free days and replace at night. Gradually increase the time with the cloche removed until the end of the week when you leave it off day and night. If the weather is mild you may not need the cloche, just move the plants outside for longer periods each day.

If you have started your seeds on a windowsill you will need to leave them in an unheated room for a day or two before moving outside to the cloche.

Planting Out

Planting cauliflower vegetable seedlingsCauliflower plants should be planted 60cm between plants and 60cm between rows. The distance between the plants will determine the size of the head so try to stick to the recommended distance. The closer you plant, the smaller the head.  It has become fashionable recently to grow mini cauliflower so if you want to keep up with the Jones's you could plant 15cm x 25cm.

Like cabbage, cauliflower needs a well compacted soil so ideally have your digging and manureing done a couple of months in advance. If this isn't possible make sure you firm around the seedling very well with your boot, it's o.k. to be heavy handed here as firm soil is very important.

Water your plants well an hour before planting. To plant your seedling make a hole in the soil the approximate size of the seedling 'plug'. You need to push the soil in around the roots firmly with your fingers to get good contact with the soil. Don't firm down on the top of the soil as this can compact it and prevent moisture getting down to the plants roots.

Water the plants after planting but do not soak them. You are better to transplant on a dull day or in the evening to prevent the plants wilting on a hot, dry day.

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Oca or Potato Homity Pie Recipe

Homity PieHomity Pie

Homity pie is a traditional British open vegetable pie. The pastry case traditionally contains a filling of potatoes and an onion and leek mixture, which is then covered with cheese.  It has a history that dates back to the efforts of the Land girls of the Second World War and the restrictions imposed by wartime rationing.

 

One-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & Potatoes

One-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & PotatoesOne-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & Potatoes

 Super easy and super tasty dish!

 

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese and Tomatoes

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and TomatoesFilo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and Tomatoes

 Stuck for an idea for how to use Chard, well why not try this dish?

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in August

Jobs to do in August

Harvest should be bountiful and the allotment is in full swing

August is the month of plenty, virtually everything you planted and sown will be giving you a crop, daily trips to the plot are recommended this month, harvesting, watering, and weeding all needing doing this month!

 

Jobs to do in January

Jobs to do on the Allotment in January
January is generally a very cold month with hard frosts freezing the ground and when the ground isn't frozen it is generally too wet to do much although there are no guarantees with British weather. Looking through my diaries, snow isn't that likely for a prolonged period but you never know.

 

Jobs to do in July

Jobs to do in July

Harvest should be bountiful and the allotment is in full swing

Now is the height of summer, the days endlessly long, temperatures usually at their peek and you should be reaping the rewards of your hard work in the preceding months. Watering in this month is crucial to stem off premature bolting, tomato blossom end rot and splitting skins.

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