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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2017
  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

Welcome to HPAA

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  • HPAA Location

    Location of the HPAA

    Location of the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

     
  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

Powdery MildewPowdery Mildew

Powdery Mildew:

This is a common fungal disease for squashes, especially in dry conditions when plants are under stress. You will see white, powdery patches of fungus on leaves, stems and in severe case, the fruits.

Remedy:

  • Mulching and watering reduces water stress and helps make plants less prone to infection.
  • Promptly removing any infected shoots will reduce subsequent infection.
  • There are no chemicals to treat powdery mildew, but you can use plant and fish oils as a preventative.
  • A study in 1999 using Milk Sprays at 40% milk and 60% water have been proven to prevent Powdery Mildew, this is best sprayed every 10 days on a sunny afternoon for best results.

No Fruit:

No fruit, or fruit rotting when very small: This is a physiological problem, caused by the growing conditions, not a pest or disease. It is a problem when the weather in early summer is cool and this causes inadequate pollination.

Remedy:

This is usually a temporary problem and once the weather starts to improve, so will pollination. You can try to hand-pollinate plants yourself by removing a male flower (they don’t have a swelling at their base) and brushing the central parts against the centre of a female flower (female flowers have a swelling at the base – this is the beginning of the fruit). But this is a bit of a hassle, and normally the plant will correct this problem itself.

Grey Mould:

This is a problem normally in wet conditions and is usually worse on weak or damaged plants. The mould usually enters through a wound, but under the right conditions even healthy plants will be infected. You will see fuzzy grey mould on affected buds, leaves, flowers or fruit. Infected plant parts eventually shrivel and die..

Remedy:

Hygiene is very important in preventing the spread of grey mould. If you see grey mould, remove the infected material and destroy. Grey mould is encouraged by overcrowding, so make sure you plant your pumpkins at the appropriate distance apart. No fungicides are approved for use by amateur gardeners against grey mould. Products containing plant and fish oil blends may be used but are unlikely to have much impact.

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Perfect Roast Potatoes

Perfect Roast PotatoesPerfect Roast Potatoes
My foolproof way of getting that perfect roastie!

 

Aubergine Parmigiana

Aubergine ParmigianaAubergine Parmigiana

This simple aubergine parmigiana recipe from Italy makes a cosy mid-week meal. Serve this cheese, tomato and aubergine bake as a vegetarian main dish, with some wholewheat garlic bread or a peppery rocket salad, or you can also make it as a hearty side for for a meat dish.!

 

Rhubarb & Grenadine Crumble

Rhubarb & Grenadine CrumbleRhubarb & Grenadine Crumble
This has a great twist, the Grenadine adds great colour and taste to the rhubarb that will add that something special to your dessert!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in May

Jobs to do in May

May is usually one of the busiest months

The soil is warm and the plants growing well. But watch out for a sneaky late frost.

 

Jobs to do in September

Jobs to do in September
September marks a change in the seasons, you'll be harvesting the last of your summer crops if you haven't already done so, crops like tomatoes, beans, peppers, sweetcorn will be finishing, but on the other hand the first of the Autumn crops will be nearing ready or may be ready like Apples, Pears, Main Crop Potatoes, Winter Squashes to name but a few!

 

Jobs to do in January

Jobs to do on the Allotment in January
January is generally a very cold month with hard frosts freezing the ground and when the ground isn't frozen it is generally too wet to do much although there are no guarantees with British weather. Looking through my diaries, snow isn't that likely for a prolonged period but you never know.

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