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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2016
  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

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Winter Squash Varieties to try

  • Autumn Crown F1 Squash
    • Bred specifically for the UK climate, including the North of England. It combines the best characteristics of colour of a butternut type along with the familiar shape of Crown Prince.
  • Bon Bon F1 Squash
    • Increasing in popularity every year. Buttercup type of flattened globe with dark green striped fruit and yellow flesh of outstanding flavour. Beautiful cut into slices and steamed gently until tender.
  • Buttercup Winter Squash
    • A winter squash with delicious dense firm flesh and superb sweet flavour. Use for roasting with the joint, soups and pumpkin pie. Unusual shape with grey-green skin.  Weight 1.5kg.
  • Butternut Winter Squash
    • Beautiful small round orange fruits. Make the perfect serving dish for pumpkin soup once the flesh has been used. Late summer and autumn crop. Plant at 60cm spacing's.
  • Cha Cha F1 Winter Squash
    • Kabocha type with dark green, slightly flat-round fruits. Bright orange flesh cooks up dry, flaky and sweet with a delicious taste. Average weight 2kg (4lbs) with a yield of 3/4 fruits per plant.
  • Connells Bush Delicata Winter Squash
    • Narrow, elongated fruits with cream coloured skin and dark green thin stripes.  Very sweet, orange flesh that can be eaten as soon as mature.
  • Crown Prince F1 Squash
    • Renowned for its eating qualities this steel grey skinned with deep orange flesh will grow to about 4kg(9lbs) in size. Its is also excellent for long term storage.
  • Gold Nugget Winter Squash
    • Early to mature these globe shaped fruit are lovely golden orange weighing up to 1kg each. Bush habit so plant at 80-90cm spacings.
  • Golden Hubbard Winter Squash
    • Vigorous trailing habit producing large, slightly ridged fruits weighing up to 3kg. Orange-yellow flesh of excellent flavour. Fruits are very good for winter storage.
  • Honey Bear F1 Squash
    • The small fruits are just the right size halved for single servings. This acorn type is deliciously starchy and sweet. Compact bush plant, with an average 3-4 fruits each. Resistant to powdery mildew. Aprox 85 days to mature from sowing.
  • Marina di Chioggia (Kabocha Squash) Winter Squash
    • Medium sized, flattened globe fruits with knobbly grey-green skin.  The fruits will store for a long time.  The delightful yellow-orange flesh improves in flavour after a few weeks.
  • Metro F1 PMR Winter Squash
    • An attractive butternut type. Slightly smaller then most. Average weight 1.5kg (3lbs) with a yield of 4/5 fruits per plant. Powdery mildew resistance helps support the improved sugar taste.
  • Musquee de Provence Winter Squash
    • Large round, semi-flat scalloped fruits weighing up to 10kg. Skin turns from green to golden brown on maturity and the flesh is a dense orange colour and of excellent flavour. Very long storage ability and plants have trailing habits.
  • Pink Banana Squash
    • An American heritage variety which has a firm, sweet, yellow-orange flesh ideal for baking.  Its skin turns pinkish-orange when mature.  Trailing up to 10ft
  • Sunshine F1 Winter Squash
  • A bright red / orange skinned Kasbocha type squash, with a sweet nutty flavour.  Stringless when baked or steamed.  The flesh can be sliced like carrot sticks for a tasty raw snack.
  • Sweet Dumpling Winter Squash
    • Unusual skin colouring of stripes of light and dark green and flesh of creamy orange. Perfect for cooking whole or stuffing.
  • Turks Turban Winter Squash
    • Shaped rather like a cottage loaf, unusual and attractive fruits are very good to eat. Perfect for stuffing and cooking whole. Space plants 100cm apart
  • Uchiki Kuri Winter Squash
  • Also called the onion squash because of its shape. Bright orange skin and flesh with a lovely nutty flavour. Late summer maturity. Plants need 100cm.
    • Waltham Butternut Squash
  • Elongated fruit with small bulbous end. Skin is pale golden orange with deep orange flesh of sweet flavour that improves after storage. Produces about 4 fruits per plant, weighing up to 2 kg.

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Oca or Potato Homity Pie Recipe

Homity PieHomity Pie

Homity pie is a traditional British open vegetable pie. The pastry case traditionally contains a filling of potatoes and an onion and leek mixture, which is then covered with cheese.  It has a history that dates back to the efforts of the Land girls of the Second World War and the restrictions imposed by wartime rationing.

 

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese and Tomatoes

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and TomatoesFilo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and Tomatoes

 Stuck for an idea for how to use Chard, well why not try this dish?

 

Perfect Roast Potatoes

Perfect Roast PotatoesPerfect Roast Potatoes
My foolproof way of getting that perfect roastie!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in May

Jobs to do in May

May is usually one of the busiest months

The soil is warm and the plants growing well. But watch out for a sneaky late frost.

 

Jobs to do in September

Jobs to do in September
September marks a change in the seasons, you'll be harvesting the last of your summer crops if you haven't already done so, crops like tomatoes, beans, peppers, sweetcorn will be finishing, but on the other hand the first of the Autumn crops will be nearing ready or may be ready like Apples, Pears, Main Crop Potatoes, Winter Squashes to name but a few!

 

Jobs to do in June

Jobs to do in June

Summer should be here!

Usually the risk of frost has passed by now, and with longer days there comes more sunshine and time to be in your allotment. If the weather is dry, then water your seed drills well before sowing any seeds – this way the young plants will develop a good root system.

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