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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2016
  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

Welcome to HPAA

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  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association: Privacy Policy

    Privacy Policy
    Here we set out our Privacy Policy on what information we collect and how we use this data
     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

     
  • HPAA Location

    Location of the HPAA

    Location of the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • History of the HPAA

    HPAA History

    The Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association has been around for over a hundred years, below is an article written by David Goodey and makes good reading!

Rhubarb CrownsRhubarb Crowns

Planting Rhubarb from Crowns  

Preparing the soil

Although the large foliage can help smother weeds, the ground should be free from perennial weeds before planting. Dig in one to two bucketfuls of well-rotted organic matter such as manure, before planting.

Planting

  • Plant crowns in November or December.
  • If necessary, planting can continue up to the beginning of March.
  • Buy named cultivars or choose a division from a strong, healthy-looking plant.
  • Plant the crown with the growing point at, or just below, the soil surface.
  • On wetter soils planting with the buds just raised out of the soil may help prevent rotting.
  • If planting more than one crown, space plants 1m (3ft) apart, with 1-2m (3-6ft) between rows.

 

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Fagiolini in Umido

Fagiolini in UmidoFagiolini in Umido

 This is a great dish to use some of the abundant Green Beans that should be available in the summer months Fagiolini in Umido is an Italian dside dish simply means Green Beans cooked in Tomato.

 

Classic Rhubarb Crumble

Classic Rhubarb CrumbleClassic Rhubarb Crumble
Growing up this was my favourite dessert & seeing as only my dad and I liked it I always had a massive portion!

 

Aubergine Parmigiana

Aubergine ParmigianaAubergine Parmigiana

This simple aubergine parmigiana recipe from Italy makes a cosy mid-week meal. Serve this cheese, tomato and aubergine bake as a vegetarian main dish, with some wholewheat garlic bread or a peppery rocket salad, or you can also make it as a hearty side for for a meat dish.!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in September

Jobs to do in September
September marks a change in the seasons, you'll be harvesting the last of your summer crops if you haven't already done so, crops like tomatoes, beans, peppers, sweetcorn will be finishing, but on the other hand the first of the Autumn crops will be nearing ready or may be ready like Apples, Pears, Main Crop Potatoes, Winter Squashes to name but a few!

 

The Growing Season

The growing season

The Growing Season varies in different parts of the United Kingdom, but in Hatfield Peverel we are blessed with a milder climate and enjoy a longer season than many parts of the country.

In this section of the web site I have tried to separate the season out into monthly sections to help and guide you through the most popular tasks and crops regularly grown on the allotment site, but if you would like a feature made of a particular vegetable or task, please get in touch and I will do my best to add it to the web site for you.

 

Jobs to do in June

Jobs to do in June

Summer should be here!

Usually the risk of frost has passed by now, and with longer days there comes more sunshine and time to be in your allotment. If the weather is dry, then water your seed drills well before sowing any seeds – this way the young plants will develop a good root system.

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