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  • Allotments for Hatfield Peverel

    Allotments for Hatfield Peverel
    Promoting Allotment Gardening in Hatfield Peverel Essex

  • Best Allotment Competition 2016
  • Dengie 100 & Maldon Bekeepers
  • Crop Rotation: A Five-Year Plan

Welcome to HPAA

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  • Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association Constitution

    Constitution

    Below we have set out the Constitution for the Hatfield Peverel Allotment Association

     
  • HPAA Rules

    HPAA Rules

    Our rules are simple and easy to understand, please read them carefully and abide by them

     
  • Cultivation Policy

    Cultivation Policy

    "Cultivation” and, more importantly “non-cultivation”, can mean different things to different people and can be interpreted in various ways. If you look around the site, you will find that there are almost as many different styles of cultivation as there are plots. It is certainly not necessary to maintain strictly regimented rows of vegetables.

     
  • Important Information


    Please take some time in reading this section carefully as it will guide you through the protocols of what is expected of each persons holding an allotment and their visitors to the allotment sites.

Gralic Problems

Problems Growing Garlic

Garlic is largely pest and disease free, but sometimes ‘rust’, a fungal disease of the foliage, can be damaging. If this happens, then grow garlic in a different part of the garden in future years and destroy all of the infected leaves.  White rot disease is present in some soils and attacks the roots. If this happens grow garlic in tubs of soil-based potting media, such as John Innes No3 compost

Onion white rot:

This fungus causes the leaves to wilt and turn yellow. Under wet conditions, the plants may not wilt but will become loose in the soil. If you lift them, you will see a white fluffy growth on the bulbs.

Remedy: Throw out any infected bulbs, and don’t grow leeks, onions or garlic in that spot again for at least eight years. This is a very persistent fungus that survives in the soil for a long time. There is no chemical control.

Leek Rust:

This is a fungal disease causing bright yellow spots on the leaves. It is often worse in long, wet spells.

Remedy: Mild attacks of rust won’t affect the plant, but serious infections may cause leaves to shrivel and affect yield. There is no control for rust once you have the infection. Make sure you don’t crowd plants as this increases both humidity and the likelihood of infection. Dispose of any badly affected plant material, and don’t grow garlic, leeks or onions in the same spot for three years.

Click Here for more information on leek rust

Growing Garlic: Flower Stalks Growing Garlic: Flower Stalks

Flower Stalks

Hardneck garlic cultivars readily produce flower stalks. The developing flowers should be removed as soon as they appear and can be used for stir fries. Softneck cultivars occasionally produce flower stalk if exposed to adverse growing conditions such as high temperatures or drought.

Birds:

These can be a problem, pulling the shallow-rooting plants out of the ground.

Remedy: Place chicken wire, fleece or plastic netting over plants to keep the birds off. They are usually not such a problem when the plants are older and growing strongly.

Pests:

Two leaf mining pests that can cause damage to the foliage of garlic and other members of the Allium family are the allium leaf-mining fly and leek moth.

 

Perrywoods Garden Centre 
HPAA sponsored company - Perrywoods Garden Centre
Thank you for your recent donation of a raffle prize with raised money for our funds!

Read more about Perrywood here

NSALG National Allotments Week

Category: Recipes

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese and Tomatoes

Filo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and TomatoesFilo Pie with Swiss Chard, Ricotta Cheese, and Tomatoes

 Stuck for an idea for how to use Chard, well why not try this dish?

 

Aubergine Parmigiana

Aubergine ParmigianaAubergine Parmigiana

This simple aubergine parmigiana recipe from Italy makes a cosy mid-week meal. Serve this cheese, tomato and aubergine bake as a vegetarian main dish, with some wholewheat garlic bread or a peppery rocket salad, or you can also make it as a hearty side for for a meat dish.!

 

One-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & Potatoes

One-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & PotatoesOne-Pot Roast Pork Chops with Fennel & Potatoes

 Super easy and super tasty dish!

Category: The Growing Season

Jobs to do in March

Jobs to do in March

Spring is starting and the new season is here

 Hopefully by now we are now standing on the threshold of Spring and the new gardening season. The days are beginning to lengthen and although it may not feel like it at times the temperatures are slowly increasing day by day. More importantly the longer days are the real trigger to new growth and you will find that with the help of a little protection you can really go for those early sowings

 

Jobs to do in May

Jobs to do in May

May is usually one of the busiest months

The soil is warm and the plants growing well. But watch out for a sneaky late frost.

 

Jobs to do in September

Jobs to do in September
September marks a change in the seasons, you'll be harvesting the last of your summer crops if you haven't already done so, crops like tomatoes, beans, peppers, sweetcorn will be finishing, but on the other hand the first of the Autumn crops will be nearing ready or may be ready like Apples, Pears, Main Crop Potatoes, Winter Squashes to name but a few!

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